Showing posts with label craft at risk. Show all posts
Showing posts with label craft at risk. Show all posts

Saturday, March 26, 2022

Living Heritage Podcast Ep217 Weaving Her Life Across Canada

Weaving and hooked rugs by Celeste Colbourne.

In this episode of the Living Heritage Podcast we talk with Celeste Colbourne about weaving including her interest and background with the craft, the process of weaving, and her experience weaving across Canada.

Celeste Colbourne in front of her loom in her home.

Celeste Colbourne is a weaver who was introduced to the intricacies of making yarn, threading a loom, and creating beautiful cloth 28 years ago in British Columbia. Over the years miles of handwoven cloth have been woven and sold in almost every province, and now she is home, weaving in Newfoundland.

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Living Heritage is about people who are engaged in the heritage and culture sector, from museum professionals and archivists, to tradition bearers and craftspeople - all those who keep history alive at the community level. The show is a partnership between HeritageNL and CHMR Radio.

Theme music is Rythme Gitan by Latché Swing.


Friday, March 18, 2022

Living Heritage Podcast Ep216 Bunches of Barrels with Lindy Rideout


In this episode we talk about Lindy's experience learning coopering or barrel making, the traditional and modern tools used, and the importance of cooperage to Cottlesville. We also discuss the historical uses for barrels as well three different grades of barrel making.
Lindy Rideout holding one of his pieces. 
Lindy Rideout is a self trained cooper who lives in Cottlesville, New World Island, NL. Using his grandfather’s cooperage tools he has made barrels, water buckets, and even a wooden hot tub. A third generation boatbuilder who builds kayaks he has also taken up painting and has tried to capture the work of barrel making including the tools, process, and people.

Coopering or barrel making is one of the crafts listed in the Heritage NL Craft at Risk List 2021


Painting completed by Lindy Rideout.

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Living Heritage is about people who are engaged in the heritage and culture sector, from museum professionals and archivists, to tradition bearers and craftspeople - all those who keep history alive at the community level. The show is a partnership between HeritageNL and CHMR Radio.

Theme music is Rythme Gitan by Latché Swing.

Friday, February 11, 2022

Living Heritage Podcast Ep213 Millinery with Mad Hatter Sara Anne Meyer

Sara Anne Meyer modelling a tricorn fascinator she created.  

In this episode of the Living Heritage Podcast we talk with Sara Anne Meyer about all things millinery! This includes the history of millinery, her interest and background with the craft, and some of the hats and fascinators she has created over the years.

Sara Anne Meyer is a multi-faceted performer, costumer, maker and poet born and raised in the St. John's arts community. She is an avid observer of intangible history and a folklore enthusiast. But above all things, she is mad as a hatter.



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Living Heritage is about people who are engaged in the heritage and culture sector, from museum professionals and archivists, to tradition bearers and craftspeople - all those who keep history alive at the community level. The show is a partnership between HeritageNL and CHMR Radio.

Theme music is Rythme Gitan by Latché Swing.



Friday, February 4, 2022

Living Heritage Podcast Ep212 Craft at Risk and Mentor-Apprentice Program with Dale Jarvis and Lara Maynard

 

Dale Jarvis and Lara Maynard at dry stone wall workshop in Brigus.
Photo by Harnum Photography. September 2021.

In this episode of the Living Heritage Podcast we talk with Dale Jarvis and Lara Maynard of Heritage NL about the 2021 Craft at Risk List, and the Mentor-Apprentice Program. We learn the background of the projects, some of the issues that face traditional craft, and what Heritage NL is doing to ensure the transmission of traditional knowledge and skills. We also learn a little about the nine Mentor-Apprentice pairs who are currently involved with the program.

Dale holds a BSc in Anthropology/Archaeology from Trent University, and a MA in Folklore from Memorial University. For many years he oversaw Heritage NL’s Intangible Cultural Heritage Office which helps communities to safeguard their traditional culture. Dale has contributed as a board member and volunteer to many local arts and heritage organizations. Former newspaper columnist, and author of several books, he is a tireless promoter of local traditions.

Lara studied English and Folklore at Memorial University and has been working or volunteering for local or provincial heritage organizations and initiatives for 20 years. A former Municipal Outreach Officer with Heritage NL, she is back on board to help deliver heritage skills training around the province.

If you want more information on the Craft at Risk List or the Mentor-Apprentice Program please visit our website for all the details: heritagecraft.ca

Our next deadline for Mentor-Apprentice Program application is February 10, 2022



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Living Heritage is about people who are engaged in the heritage and culture sector, from museum professionals and archivists, to tradition bearers and craftspeople - all those who keep history alive at the community level. The show is a partnership between HeritageNL and CHMR Radio.

Theme music is Rythme Gitan by Latché Swing.


Wednesday, January 12, 2022

Saving Endangered Crafts across Newfoundland and Labrador: Introducing Heritage NL's Mentor-Apprentice Participants




Colourful wooden boat created by Newfoundland artist Jerome Canning.


From boatbuilding to bark tanning, traditional skills at risk of being lost in Newfoundland and Labrador just got a boost from Heritage NL.


Nine projects from all across the province that pair a learner with an experienced craftsperson have been given the green light by Heritage NL, the provincial agency that deals with historic places and living heritage. 


The Heritage NL Mentor-Apprentice Program is a one-on-one immersion program that provides funding up to $10,000 to support the teaching of endangered crafts and skills from an established mentor to an apprentice craftsperson or tradesperson. 


“The traditional craft sector is an important part of our contemporary economy, especially in rural areas,” says folklorist Dale Jarvis, Executive Director of Heritage NL. “We are excited to support these tradition bearers and entrepreneurs in learning and promoting skills and crafts that otherwise might fade away.”


The participants will have a year to work together, teaching and learning a variety of skills including weaving, making traditional Labrador clothing, and manufacturing Uilleann (Irish) bagpipes. There are two more opportunities for people interested in traditional skills to apply to the program, February 10 and April 10, 2022, with more information online at heritagenl.ca. 


This program is supported by the Labour Market Partnerships program, Department of Immigration, Skills and Labour, Government of Newfoundland and Labrador.


The approved mentor/apprentice projects are as follows:


Labrador duffle work, (a pure wool fabric originally used for blankets and coats).

Mentor Joyce Lee, Red Bay,  with apprentice Miranda Rumbolt, Mary’s Harbour.  


Rodney punt design and construction

Mentor Jerome Canning, St. John’s, with apprentice Chris Hogan, St. John’s.


Bark tanning 

Mentor Susan Furneaux, Conception Harbour, with apprentice Nicole Travers, Lark Harbour.


Uilleann (Irish) bagpipe making

Mentor Neil O'Grady, Carbonear, with apprentice Robert Brown. 


Wild food processing and preserving

Mentor Lori McCarthy, St. John’s with apprentice Tina White, Mount Pearl.


Labrador cossack (dickie) making

Mentor Charlene Rumbolt, Mary’s Harbour, with apprentice Katie Lee, Red Bay.


Weaving skills

Mentor Stephanie Stoker, St. John’s, with apprentice Chantelle Evans, Makkovik;

and

Mentor Megan Samms, Katalisk / Codroy Valley, with apprentice Jane Walker, Bonavista;

and

Mentor Jessica McDonald, St. John’s, with apprentice Christian Dauble, St. John’s.



For more information or photos, contact:


Dale Jarvis

Heritage NL

dale@heritagenl.ca

https://heritagenl.ca/programs/craft-at-risk/ 


Take a look at some of the beautiful work our apprentices have made. More details on our Mentor-Apprentice program to come!



A beaded shield. Bark Tanning work created by apprentice Nicole Travers.



Storage of Japanese Knotweed - a Foodways preservation technique credited to apprentice Tina White.


Goose Eye Weaving by apprentice Chantelle Evans.


Duffle work courtesy of mentor Joyce Lee.


On the loom - Weaving in process by apprentice Chantelle Evans.


Linen weaving by mentor Stephanie Stoker.


Mentor Susan Furneaux's "Small Landscape" bark tanning.


Apprentice Jane Walker's first completed woven scarf.


A woven baby blanket by apprentice Christian Dauble.


Thursday, October 28, 2021

Heritage NL Craft at Risk


Two of the province’s leading cultural bodies are worried about a decline in traditional craft skills.

Newfoundland and Labrador is known for its traditions and culture, heritage skills, arts, and crafts. Some of those, like rug-hooking, have seen a resurgence in interest. Others, like birch broom making or Indigenous basket-making traditions, face an uncertain future.

Concerned about the loss of traditional know-how, Heritage NL and the Craft Council of NL are working to document these crafts at risk and developing a new funding program to encourage the sharing of heritage skills.

The Heritage NL Craft at Risk List 2021 features 55 crafts, 10 of which are listed as critically endangered. These include things such as bark tanning, harness making, and the fabrication of tin flat-bottom kettles. An additional 32 crafts are listed as endangered, while 12 crafts are listed as currently viable. One craft, rope making, is listed as having become extinct in the last generation.

Heritage NL Craft at Risk List 2021
https://heritagenl.ca/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/Craft-at-Risk-List-2021.pdf


“The promotion and support of craft producers in the province is a vital part of maintaining and developing the cultural diversity that makes Newfoundland and Labrador unique,” says Rowena House, Executive Director of Craft Council of NL. “This furthers the preservation of traditional craftsmanship while pushing the boundaries of fine craft among the provincial producers.”

Recognizing the importance of tradition-bearers to the transmission of craft, Heritage NL has developed a new grant program designed to pass on these skills at risk. The new Mentor-Apprentice program has funds of up to $10,000 per grant, split between a teacher/learner pair, to help maintain those crafts which the organizations have listed as either critically endangered or endangered.

Heritage NL Mentor-Apprentice Program
https://heritagenl.ca/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/Mentor-Apprentice-Program.pdf

“One possible project could be a master boatbuilder taking on an apprentice during the construction of a regionally-specific boat type, for example,” says Dale Jarvis, Executive Director of Heritage NL. “Our staff will work with the mentor-apprentice team to help focus their final product, and to record and photograph their work for posterity.”

There are three deadlines for the pilot granting program, in December of this year, and February and April of 2022.

The project is supported by the Labour Market Partnerships program, Department of Immigration, Skills and Labour, Government of Newfoundland and Labrador.

Information on both the list and the granting program are available through the Heritage NL website - www.heritagenl.ca/programs/craft-at-risk

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For more information contact:

Dale Jarvis, Executive Director
Heritage NL
dale@heritagenl.ca
709-739-1892 x1
www.heritagenl.ca/programs/craft-at-risk